Extrinsic vs Intrinsic Reinforcement

 
Extrinsic vs Intrinsic Reinforcement

Extrinsic vs Intrinsic Reinforcement 

The employees to learn a particular type of behaviour externally use extrinsic reinforcement. The environment in the factory helps exercise extrinsic reinforcement. The employee is influenced by external cues and stimuli. The relationship between the supervisor and employees, monetary incentives and favourable work conditions are several examples of external reinforcement. 
The behaviour of and instructions by peers and seers are used for moulding the behaviour
of the employees. 
  • Extrinsic reinforcement is external and has other activities influencing the learning process as reinforcement. 
  • Intrinsic reinforcement is internal and uses self- reinforcement. When the employee develops his own understanding of the problem, it is self-reinforcement.
  • Intrinsic reinforcement is self-realisation and improvement of behaviour. Feelings and motives become intrinsic reinforcement.
  •  Intrinsic reinforcement is considered a more forceful process of learning. 
  • Extrinsic reinforcement will not be effective unless intrinsic reinforcement is applied for learning. It is self-appraisal and development.
  • Extrinsic reinforcement is evaluated by employees and, if accepted as useful, will be converted into intrinsic reinforcement. 
  • Extrinsic and intrinsic reinforcement are used for learning purposes.
  •  Intrinsic reinforcement is personal and relates to satisfaction, recognition, challenges, growth and responsibilities.
  •  Extrinsic reinforcement is ultimately evaluated at the level of intrinsic reinforcement. The success of reinforcement depends on how much it influences the internal drive of the employees. In extrinsic reinforcement, for example, monetary incentives would be ineffective if it is not internally accepted as the drive for learning and improvement in behaviour.